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TASIS Students Take on the Mini-Saga
Posted 04/25/2018 09:00PM

The TASIS Writing Team and High School English Department recently sponsored a creative writing contest in which High School students could submit a maximum of three mini-sagas, taking note of the following criteria:

  • A mini-saga is exactly 50 words (not including the title, which can be a maximum of 15 words).
  • A mini-saga tells a story and has a beginning, a middle, and an end. (In other words, it can’t just be a description of something.)

The first mini-sagas appeared in The Sunday Telegraph in 1982 when the newspaper announced the contest and held a competition. See some of the winning submissions from a later contest here.

For the TASIS competition, the venerable High School English Department of Dr. Christopher Love, Mr. Peter Locke, Mr. Matthew Federico, Ms. Anna Kavalauskas, and Ms. Sarann Dye descended from its ivory tower of academia and assembled on the hallowed grounds of the Casa Fleming patio on the afternoon of April 25 to appraise the submissions without knowing who had written them. After a spirited and at times truculent back and forth, the five guardians of the mini-saga deemed that the following stories, listed alphabetically by the author’s last name, are most worthy of commendation. Congratulations to the winners, who will be rewarded with some special campus privileges in the coming weeks.

Almost There

By Anastasia Kolesnikova ’18

They told her she could rule her life. So she walked roads she wanted to walk in clothes she wanted to wear, but they kept on building barricades on the streets of her city. Yet everyone was "very surprised" to find her corpse two blocks away from the town gates.

 

The Next in Line

By Jessica Landa ’18

"Was it everything you ever wanted?" wide-eyed.
"No," matter-of-factly.
"Will you go again?" in dismay.
He turned.
"Listen: when you come back from that--" finger pointed, "you'll know why I won't answer. It's rocky. The others are rude. Nothing makes sense until you've just about finished. Are you prepared?"
"Fine."

 

Is That A?

By Jessica Landa ’18

"A dragon."
"I'm going insane. That's not a-"
"Draaggon."
"Is it-?"
"He."
"-he yours?"
"I don't own him."
"I think he hates me."
"Not true." A snarl. "Maybe."
"..."
"What?"
"Does he breathe fire?"
"Pretty sure it's oxygen."
"..."
Do you want to come with us?"
"Where?"
"Vet. He needs his shots."

 

A Conversation between James Daniel and his Son

By Alex Secilmis ’19

“I fought with my father all the time. He owned a thriving brewery in Tennessee, and was always drunk, there was neither a grain nor a drop of kindness in that cruel man.”

“Did you not like your dad at all?” the man’s son asked.

“No Jack, not one bit.”

 

The Girl and the Sun

By Laura Tepedino ’20

It rained for years. One morning, the sun shined through her window. It was finally warm. But the light was too strong and too kind and she was too small and too blind.

So she ran away.

The sun shined somewhere else, never as bright. And she missed him everyday.



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